Proudly hosted by the Aboriginal Drug & Alcohol Council (SA) Aboriginal Corporation.

Workshop: ‘Don’t Get Me Wild…’

25 Mar 2021
15.00
Ballroom 4 & 5

Workshop: ‘Don’t Get Me Wild…’

‘Don’t Get Me Wild…!’ is an anger management program designed and written by Gindaja Treatment and Healing Indigenous Corporation with funding from the North Queensland Primary Health Network.

While there are an abundance of anger management programs, advice, frameworks and suggested session plans in the peer reviewed and grey literature, there were none that specifically reflected a First Nations approach (or experience).  In particular, the part that historical grief and loss, dispossession, loss of Indigenous culture and identity and the stolen generations have had on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

‘Don’t Get Me Wild…!’ has been written from a Yarrabah cultural perspective and takes on the humour of irony which is so prevalent in the community.  The title came from a group meeting between Gindaja staff who wanted to create something that was intrinsically ‘Yarrabian’ and which spoke to clients/participants in a unique way.

This interactive workshop will facilitate conference delegates as ‘program participants’ through 2 sessions of the program.  Delegates will divide into small groups of between 5-8 participants each and Gindaja’s 2 program facilitators will guide participants through a range of simple activities and discussions drawn from 2 sessions of the program.  Delegates will each receive a copy of a participant handbook to record their groups experience.

The aim of this workshop is to demonstrate how a deep connection and understanding of both individual and collective anger can be transformed into a ‘pathway to healing’.

Training Objectives

  1. To highlight how our anger is often underpinned by unresolved issues of deep wounds and hurt and this can act as a barrier to recovery and healing for many Indigenous AOD clients
  2. To demonstrate how an Indigenous approach goes beyond ‘management’ of anger to ‘healing’ of the causal issues that underpin it.